Servicemen killed in WWII to finally be buried in California

This undated photo released by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) shows U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Homer Spence and Marine Corps Reserve Assistant Cook Frank Masoni, of Gilroy, Calif. He will be buried Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017 with military honors, according to the Defense Department. Two U.S. servicemen whose remains were identified more than six decades after they were killed overseas during World War II will finally get funerals in their California hometowns. Masoni was killed in Nov. 1943 during a battle with Japanese forces on an island in the Pacific Ocean. He was 21. His remains were identified using dental and other records. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency via AP)

MANTECA, Calif. (AP) — Two U.S. servicemen whose remains were identified more than six decades after they were killed overseas during World War II will finally get funerals in their California hometowns.

The Defense Department says Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Homer Spence and Marine Corps Reserve Assistant Cook Frank Masoni will be buried Saturday with military honors. Spence’s funeral is in Manteca, and the service for Masoni is in Gilroy.

The plane Spence was piloting disappeared during a mission over southern Germany in July 1944. He was 22. The wreckage was found in 2010, and Spence’s remains were identified using DNA analysis.

Masoni was killed in November 1943 during a battle with Japanese forces on an island in the Pacific Ocean. He was 21. His remains were identified using dental and other records.

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